Top World War II Female Icon

The title for the top WWII female icon, no doubt, goes to Rosie the Riveter.  Rosie represented the American women who took up work in the factories in order to fill the vacancies left by the men enrolled in the service.  The continued demands of manufacturing munitions and war supplies during WWII made women’s role crucial.  Rosie not only represented feminism, but also women’s economic power.  Once the war was over, however, it was anticipated that these women would return to their housework.   The government used various means to encourage women to join the work forces.  However, much of it was directed at the husbands who seemed reluctant to support their wife’s employment.  Rosie the Riveter’s journey began with a song title.  The song, written by Redd Evans and John Loeb, used a fictitious character Rosie to represent women doing their part to assist the war efforts at home - despite their tireless task of being assembly line workers.   As the song gained popularity, Rose Will Monroe, a woman working as a riveter during WWII, was given the opportunity to star in a film about the war efforts at home.  Monroe seemed the closest fit to the persona of the woman described in the song “Rosie the Riveter”.  Her appearance in the film began her claim to fame as what could possibly be described as the most recognized icon of the WWII era.  She went on to appear in additional films and on posters in an effort to encourage women to work outside the home in support of the war.  Her involvement is said to have had...

Top Five WWII Posters

Having been so prevalent during World War II, compiling a list of top five US posters from this era is a difficult task and open to interpretation.  Below is one such attempt focusing on posters that continue to be highly recognized some 70+ years later.   Significance of WWII Posters During WWII, the United States used posters as a way to deeply connect with the American people in an effort to ignite their hatred for the enemy, their support for the Allies and support the increased need for war production, victory gardens, rationing and war bonds.  The posters ignited a passion among the people and a unity that has been unmatched since.  Today, 70+ years later, many of these posters are still highly recognizable and carry a tremendous amount of loyalty among WWII era citizens and collectors of WWII posters or memorabilia.     I Want You - Though initially used in WWI, the number one poster on any World War II list should be Uncle Sam’s “I Want You for U.S. Army”.  The Uncle Sam figure – as pictured on this poster – has continued to be an American icon both on and off the poster.     We Can Do It - The “We Can Do It” poster earned its place on this list due to the iconic “Rosie the Riveter” and her flexed muscles supporting the newly mandated role of the women in the work force, while also promoting their strength and ability to make a significant difference in the war efforts.  Rosie is still highly recognizable today.     Demember December 7th – This poster...