Top US Navy Admirals of WWII

During WWII, the US Navy gave birth to some of its top admirals.  The role of these Admirals in the war against Japan and in the wars against Germany and Italy was critical.  Listed in below – in alphabetical order – are some of the top US Navy Admirals of World War II.   Admiral Frank Fletcher – Though known for his participation in the Battle of Coral Sea and the Battle of Midway, Fletcher is especially known as the first commander of a carrier-vs-carrier battle.  The carriers were never in sight of each other as the planes they launched engaged in fighting.  Fletcher participated in continuous combat in the Pacific theater from December 7, 1941 to September 30, 1942.     Fleet Admiral William Halsey, Jr. – During WWII, Halsey was commander of the South Pacific Area (1942-44).  From 1944-45, he was commander of the United States Third Fleet.  His participation and leadership in the Solomon Islands Campaign, the Guadalcanal Campaign and the Battle of Leyte Gulf earned him a place on this list.       Fleet Admiral Ernest King – King was the United States Chief of Naval Operations during World War II.  In this position, he directed all US Navy’s operations.  Having previously been appointed Commander-in-Chief of the United States Fleet (December, 1941), he was the only person to hold both commands simultaneously.       Fleet Admiral Chester Nimitz – This WWII naval officer also held dual commands when he took command of the Pacific Ocean Area along with his position as Commander in Chief, US Pacific Fleet.  Fleet Admiral Nimitz was the leading...

US Aircraft Carriers of WWII

The role of the US aircraft carrier in WWII cannot be overlooked, especially as some of the most significant battles of WWII took place at sea.  The importance of Naval technology was paramount during this time given the global involvement of World War II.  The role of the aircraft carrier was to deliver planes to a closer proximity of distinct battles. This was especially true in the Pacific as many of the battles occurred on various islands and along the coastal areas.   The War Begins After the bombing of Pearl Harbor, the United States entered into the war.  Within three months, carriers Enterprise and Yorktown were involved in the first US aircraft carrier offensive, attacking Japanese installations on several Pacific islands.   Throughout the balance of 1942, a number of aircraft carriers would be utilized to throughout the war including the Battle of the Coral Sea and the Battle of Midway.   Battle of the Coral Sea During the Battle of the Coral Sea (May 4-8, 1942), the USS Yorktown was once again involved, this time accompanied by the USS Lexington.  This battle was the first to be fought without the opposing ships coming into contact with each other.  The Japanese lost their light carrier – the Shoho and the US Navy lost the USS Lexington.  The battle did prevent the Japanese from landing at Port Moresby.     Battle of Midway From June 3-6, 1942, in an attempt to gain occupancy of Midway Island, the Japanese launched a full offensive operation, in which the USS Yorktown, USS Hornet and USS Enterprise were greatly outnumbered.  However, four of...

Number One Top Battleship of WWII

When looking for the number one top battleship of WWII, one doesn’t have to look too far.  The obvious choice for this spot, and for a number of reasons, is the Imperial Japanese Navy battleship – Yamato.  The lead ship of the Yamato class, the IJN Yamato – in conjunction with her sister ship the Musashi – take top spot as the heaviest and the most powerful armed battleships having ever been constructed. It’s like stepping onto a Hollywood set right in the heart of the action as you enter the WWII Pearl Harbor Gallery at AFHM, witnessing the large detailed scale models of the Japanese ships used in the filming of the world renowned movie Tora! Tora! Tora!   The impressive diorama displays the ships at sea with a 20 ft theater screen in the background showing original film footage from the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor.    A Look at Yamato Yamato was officially commissioned just one week following the Pearl Harbor attack.  The objective for this magnificent ship was to counter the significant number of outstanding US battleship fleet.  The ship was 862 ft. 10 inches long with a beam of 127 feet 7 inches and was capable of a top spec of 50km/h – or 31 mph.  This World War II battleship had a range of 7,100 nautical miles.   The armament on the Yamato was both impressive and unique, including 9 x 26 cm, 6 x 155 mm, 24 x 127 mm, 162 x 25mm anti-aircraft and 4 x 13.2 mm AA.  This armament was so superior, it is said that a shell launched even...